jump to navigation

Guggenheim Debuts Web Video Biennial October 10, 2010

Posted by Joanne KY Teoh in Reviews, Trends, Web Video, YouTube.
Tags: , , , ,
trackback

Fresh from my engagement at the Open Video Conference in NYC, I am convinced that no other medium is pushing the boundaries of creativity like video. Much is in store for Web video advocates, activists and artists.

The Guggenheim Museum is recognizing the importance of video art by creating YouTube Play, its first biennial of online creative video. The collaboration with YouTube combines an online site, a juried contest, and showings at Guggenheim museums in New York, Bilbao, Venice, and Berlin.

The 20 videos shortlisted from 23,000 submissions will be announced at the New York Guggenheim on October 21 at an event streamed live on the YouTube Play channel. The selected videos will be screened at Guggenheim museums and will be archived online.

So what makes the cut? The shortlist is reviewed by a panel that includes film director Darren Aronofsky, visual artist Takashi Murakami, recording artist Laurie Anderson, video artist Douglas Gordon and museum curator Nancy Spector.

While online video art is not new, the biennial shows the form is being recognized by the art establishment. YouTube is one of the platforms where people are sharing creative video. The biennale exposes viewers to work that they would not normally see. Viewers can then interact by posting comments.

“We wanted to look at what’s happening right now online and be part of it,” says Hanne Mugaas, territorial associate for the YouTube Play biennial. “There’s a history of artists working online. For the new generation of artists, the Internet has always been there while they were growing up, so it’s an everyday tool. It’s a tool not only for artistic production, but also for distribution and inspiration, and a platform for sharing.”

Visit YouTube Play to see the short list of finalists and come back on the 21st to see which 20 were selected.

Related reads
See It Now! Video journalism is dying. Long live video journalism. – CJR

Advertisements

Comments»

No comments yet — be the first.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: